New Menu Review: Rhoda’s Winter Dishes

New Menu Review: Rhoda’s Winter Dishes

Go with an adventurous spirit and you’ll be rewarded

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Foodie  Foodie Your Guide to Good Taste  on 7 Jan '18

Rhoda has established itself as a restaurant to take a palate-seeking adventure.

EDIT June, 2019: Sadly, Rhoda has closed it's doors. Another one bites the dust

Chef Nate Green has a deep-rooted belief in using every part of the animal, and forgotten meats such as ox tongue, chicken heart and pig’s trotter feature regularly – and taste delicious – so it is the ideal place to open yourself up to new flavours. It’s also possible to feel good about occasional meat eating here, when an animal is so responsibly and ethically utilised. And Chef Green does his veg up as good as his meat, whipping them into interesting and unique combinations, so greener pastures are possible too.

Here are some of the dishes that are padding out Rhoda’s winter menu:

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The vibrant vermillion of the cured ox heart (price upon request) is as fierce as the flavour: intensely gamey, smooth and lean, but not for the faint of heart.


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The bone marrow whipped with shallots and parsley ($88) is an easy spread over toast and made for an indulgent opener.


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The heirloom Curious Cropper tomatoes ($138) from New Zealand were a beauty to behold and needed nothing much to dress up their natural flavours, but a splash of sweetened soy and some Parm and basil made this into a party of a salad.


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Smoked aubergine with blue cheese, walnut, honeycomb and salted pear ($128) was an interesting mix, with several strong flavours vying for top spot on the tongue.


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Chef Green is the king of oft-overlooked animal parts like kidney and liver; here, he shows off how to do up devilled chicken hearts ($118) that will capture your own with their dense deliciousness and punchy, piquant sauce.


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The Wild Hereford ox tongue ($118) is one of those adventurous flavours we were talking about. It takes the Italian classic tonnato and swaps the veal for ox, with the rich flavour of the meat meshing well with the hamachi mayo and capers.


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The perfectly tender octopus ($158) was enhanced with slices of kumquat and chilli butter with fennel for a decadent medley that accented the natural sweetness of the seafood, with a touch of acidity from the fruit and a slight floral bouquet of aniseed.


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An exciting meat-free concocotion that showcases one of 2017’s favourite vegetables, the cauliflower roasted with miso and yeast ($128) was dressed with a walnut pesto that made the whole dish dance on the tongue.


Image titleThis light and colourful dish of pea shoots and edamame ($108) was devoured by us green lovers and is worth ordering purely for the lively katsuobushi that struts its way off the plate and onto the tongue with its umami awesomeness.


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The chocolate and stout cake ($108) gained a welcome intensity from the dark beer, and the coffee-topped ice cream added a sweet bitterness.


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These are black olive madeleines ($78). They may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but they were ours. We could’ve eaten a hundred of these little bad boys.


G/F, Upton, 345 Des Voeux Road West, Sai Ying Pun, 2177 5050


This write-up is based on a complimentary media tasting provided in exchange for an honest review and no monetary compensation. The opinions expressed here represent the author’s.







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