Fang Fang’s New Focus

Fang Fang’s New Focus

When Chinese tradition meets modernity in Lan Kwai Fong

Brought to you by:  
Ashley Tang  Ashley Tang  on 7 Jul '19


Fang Fang, previously offering a pan-Asian menu, has become more Chinese focused, and with the new direction it’s taking, I think it’s on the right track. Truthfully, Fang Fang feels underrated, but the new menu has the potential to serve as some fresh competition in Central.

The restaurant’s slick interior is filled with Chinese motifs. Red- and blue-accented booths add a pop of colour, and the dining area is super spacious. I recommend going before dinner and sitting in the lounge area at the front. This space is both intimate and lofty, a upbeat place to linger with a drink or two before being seated.

Fang Fang Hong Kong

Fang Fang Hong Kong

Fang Fang Hong Kong

Fang Fang Hong KongSitting down, we were immediately served a bounty of small plates including roasted pigeon ($98), steamed scallop with glass noodles ($88/2), typhoon shelter soft-shell crab ($168) and a variety of dim sum – shrimp har gow ($68), pan-seared chicken dumplings ($78) and truffle mushroom spring roll ($68).

These dishes were hearty and safe, colourful modern twists to classic Chinese dishes. The soft-shell crab flavoured with Sichuan peppercorn and chilli was the overall winner, crisp and aromatic with garlic, while the roasted pigeon was the top comfort-food dish on the table.


Fang Fang Hong Kong

It’s the signature large plates that shine at Fang Fang. The new beggar’s chicken ($880; 24-hour advance notice required) is stuffed with a mix of vegetables and wrapped in lotus leaves before being covered with dough and baked for hours. I had so much fun cracking open the bread crust with a hammer before the chicken was sliced! Earthy and tender, this dish is perfect for a group of 4–6 to share.

Fang Fang Hong Kong

Fang Fang Hong Kong

The famous roasted duck ($325 for ½ or $525 for whole) was also served in a generous portion, crisp and juicy but a little on the fatty side. I liked the idea of crêpes being served as substitutes to the classic thin pancakes and the array of sauces offered beyond hoisin.

Fang Fang Hong Kong

Fang Fang Hong Kong

Fang Fang Hong Kong

The last set of dishes to arrive were the golden prawns ($218), truffle fried rice ($118) and sautéed green asparagus ($110). The truffle elevated the typical fluffy fried rice, but unfortunately, it was on the bland side, while the prawn batter had a powdery, excessively salty texture and taste that was too dry on the palate.

Cocktails

Fang Fang Hong Kong

The six spice-inspired cocktails are spot on for the new Chinese-focused menu. I didn’t have a chance to try all of them, but for something fresh, I recommend the Sichuan Pepper ($120), which combines gin, basil, lychee and lemon. The famous Sichuan peppercorn is highlighted at the end, leaving a clean but spicy kick.


Fang Fang Hong Kong

For an aperitif, I recommend the unique Black Garlic ($120). It might sound kind of scary to drink (because who wants garlic breath?), but the cocktail itself is creamy and aromatic. There is no punchy, overwhelming flavour of garlic, and because this ingredient is fermented, there is a mellow sweetness instead, enhancing the buttery vermouth and whisky.


Verdict

Fang Fang’s change of focus from pan-Asian to Chinese-style dishes strengthens the restaurant’s approach. The food is colourful and fresh, with contemporary twists to traditional dishes. The kitchen and bar team do a great job of utilising authentic Chinese ingredients for the new menu and cocktails. I recommend Fang Fang for large groups and before a night out in LKF.


8/F, LKF Tower, 33 Wyndham Street, Central, 2983 9083, book online


This write-up is based on a complimentary media tasting provided in exchange for an honest review and no monetary compensation. The opinions expressed here represent the author’s.


For more reviews like this, like Foodie on Facebook


Ashley Tang

Ashley Tang

The perfect balance of sweetness and tang.

share the ♥